1

Your cart is empty.

08 Oct '17

What is Halal Beauty And Why Is It Relevant to Vegans?

Posted by Unicorn Goods

 Halal

Vegan friendly cosmetics extend beyond "cruelty free"

One of the new buzzwords of beauty is halal – cosmetics that are adherent to the Muslim concept of halal, meaning “acceptable” or “permitted”. In Europe, halal cosmetics are certified by Halal Certification Europe, and in the US they are certified by the ISWA Halal Certification Department.

Read more on Vilda

02 May '16

Vegan Eyelashes To Go With Vegan Clothing

Posted by Unicorn Goods

Beyoncé's mink eyelashesBeyoncé's mink eyelashes = not cool.

Who doesn't want longer, thicker eyelashes? It's a timeless symbol of beauty. Lately, everyone seems to be obsessed with eyelashes. Those who are unhappy with their natural eyelashes are turning to fake eyelashes, trying out everything from false lashes to eyelash extensions. But this beauty trend has a dark side. These fake eyelashes are made from cute furry animals called mink.

Mink A mink's rich glossy coat in its wild state is brown and looks silky, but farm-bred mink can vary from white to almost black.

Minks don't have eyelashes. Yep. This small furry creature looks as confused as we are. Even if minks did have eyelashes, taking them to use on humans is weird, to say the least, and cruel. But what really happens is far worse. Minks are killed and their furs are turned into fake human eyelashes. It seems that marketing tactics have succeeded in depicting mink lashes as a luxury items. This practice is far removed from the reality of industrialized fur farming. Mink fur farms are inhumane and cruel. By buying mink lashes, you are killing cute minks in horrible, terrible ways.

The minks behind mink eyelashes are raised in captivity on fur farms. They live their entire lives encage, without the ability to move more than a few steps. They stand on grated cages that hurt their sensitive paws. Minks, like all living animals, are not meant to be kept in crowded confinement. In response to these tortuous conditions, minks sometimes self-mutilate or resort to cannibalizing one another.

Many people assume that producing lashes does not mandate that minks be killed; this is an insidious misconception. In fur farming, the only minks kept alive are those used as breeding stock; the rest are killed. Their fur is harvested to make clothes, mostly, but the oil, fat, and feces they produce are harvested as well. Purchasing mink lashes directly contributes to the growth of the mink farming industry as a whole. Thirty-one million minks are killed in the U.S. each year, making up approximately 90% of the total animals on fur farms.

Mink farming is also an environmental issue. Producing one kilogram of mink fur has five times the environmental impact of producing the next highest-scoring textile. For these reasons, it is vital that people be aware of the many existing alternatives to mink lashes.

VEGAN ALTERNATIVES TO MINK EYELASHES

Instead of: Mink False LashesTry: Vegan False Lashes

SugarVenom Buttercup Faux Mink Lashes

VEGAN ALTERNATIVES TO EYELASH GROWTH SERUM

Instead of: Lash Growth SerumTry: Vegan Lash Growth Serum

 B True Beauty All Natural Eyelash Enhancer

Most vegan lash growth serums do not contain parabens or harsh chemicals that irritate your eyes. Another advantage is they do not contain prostaglandin, an ingredient derived from animal tissue found in common lash growth formulas, like Latisse. This ingredient is responsible for permanently darkening eyes colors.

VEGAN ALTERNATIVES TO SALON LASH TREATMENTS

Instead of: Salon Lash Treatment | Try: Vegan Keratin Lash Lift

If you're going to a salon for lash treatment, make sure it's vegan. Eyelash lift treatments use keratin, casein, and biotin which are normally derived from animals and are not vegan. Keratin can be derived from horse hooves, hair, feathers, and horns. Vegan keratin does exist, and it is made from plant amino acids, so be sure to ask your lash technician.

SHOP VEGAN LASH PRODUCTS HERE

Cited: The Environmental Impact of Mink Fur Production, 2011, CE DelftA Federal Ban on Fur Farming Across the United States: Long Overdue Legislation, 2013, Christine Sun, Seton Hall University Law School

20 Apr '16

Cruelty Free Doesn't Mean Vegan

Posted by Unicorn Goods

Cruelty Free Makeup Labels and What They Mean

Lab RabbitsLab rabbits waiting to be tested on.

You’ve probably read cosmetic labels that say “cruelty free” and “not tested on animals” but have you ever stopped to think what do these words actually mean? Just because a product claims that it’s “cruelty free” doesn’t mean that it is. According to the Federal Drug Administration of the United States there is no legal definition for “cruelty free” so brands can adopt this term loosely, and they most certainly do. The actual term “cruelty free” is not trademarked, and can be used freely. Here are some examples of random and unsubstantiated cruelty-free labels.

FAKE CRUELTY FREE LOGOS

 Fake Cruelty Free Logo 1 Fake Cruelty Free Logo 2 Fake Cruelty Free Logo 3

Remember, without certification, the above are virtually meaningless.

THE REAL DEAL

The only way to really tell if a cosmetic product doesn’t test on animals is to look for a third-party certification icon like the three listed below. When products have a label like one of the three below, they have agreed to be evaluated for the truthfulness of their statements and have met certain standards proving that they are indeed cruelty free. Here’s a look at the differences between these labels. Keep in mind that cruelty free doesn’t mean vegan, but that’s another discussion. All body, cosmetics, and beauty products listed  on Unicorn Goods must have at least one of these standards or prove that they are cruelty-free and vegan.

PETA's Cruelty Free Beauty Without Bunnies

PETA's Beauty without Bunnies Program | This program, based out of the USA,  is one of the largest cruelty-free accreditation programs and includes over six hundred different companies. | Mandates: This program requires that no new animal testing can take place at any phase of product development a certified company, its laboratories, or ingredient suppliers. |  Accountability: PETA believes that a company puts its image at risk if it falsies cruelty free claims. This economic risk and potential damage of public perception to hold companies accountable. 

Leaping Bunny

Leaping Bunny Program | This international program was formed by eight national animal protection groups who came together to form the Coalition for Consumer Information on Cosmetics (CCIC) which administers the Leaping Bunny Program. | Mandates:To become certified a must agree that company does not and shall not conduct, commission, or be a party to animal testing this includes formulations and Ingredients of such products. The program also requires a supplier monitoring system be put in place. Companies also cannot allow animal testing to be performed by or for submission to regulatory agencies in foreign countries. | Accountability:  A company's supplier monitoring system must be submitted to an independent audit.

Choose Cruelty Free

Choose Cruelty FreeThis Australia-based nonprofit organization accredits companies and actively campaigns for an end to animal testing of cosmetics, toiletries and other household products. | Mandates: They will not accredit companies unless all parent and subsidiaries are also accredited (think the Body Shop, owned by L'oreal). Companies must fit one of two criteria (1) The company meets the never tested rule: none of its products and none of its product ingredients have ever been tested on animals by it, by anyone on its behalf, by its suppliers or anyone on their behalf. (2) The five year or more rolling rule: None of its products and none of its product ingredients have been tested on animals by it at any time within a period of five years immediately preceding the date of application for accreditation. | Accountability: Accredited companies sign a  legally-binding contract to the effect that what they have said in their application is factual.

A LOOK AT THREE CRUELTY FREE CERTIFICATIONS

Cruelty free logo comparison

Look out for one of the above legitimate labels when you shop, or just shop with us. We’ve got your back, and bunnies’ and beagles’ backs, too.

Our standards.

Lab testing on beagles.




Please select a wishlist category

Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out